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"Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it."

- George Santayana

Global Technology Concerns. The subject of the third case study analysis is Google’s actions in China. Please read the following

article, Why Google Quit China – And Why It’s Heading Back. (https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/whygoogle-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482) And, listen to the instructor video posted in the discussion thread below.

Let's Talk

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For this discussion answer the following questions in your initial post:

Post

(due Sunday of week 6)

Replies

(due Sunday of week 7)

Transcultural global ethics always maintains the value of human

rights. Have Google’s operations been consistent with the value

of human rights? What example can you give to support your

position?

Google is in the internet business, but many global operations

include sourcing supplies that are sold elsewhere. What

suggestions would you have for an organization that is seeking

to enter the global market for sourcing products and services in

order to support human rights and provide some standard for

ethical transactions?

What role do bribes play in conducting business overseas? Are

technology companies, which are eager to gain market share in

growing economies, at risk of violating the provisions of the

Foreign Corrupt Practices Act?

In your replies, discuss the elements necessary to support an

organization’s transcultural ethics policy.

Reply to at least 3 classmates.

References and Image Sources

Discussion

Guide

Discussion

Criteria

Discussion

Outcomes

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(https:// TREVOR KREJCI

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Feb 10, 2020

Chinese States of America

Trevor Krejci

Excelsior College

Instructor: Mark Kern

2/10/2020

The very essence of Google is a violation of Human Rights. Their business is based around an algorithm that records peoples

search history. This gets put into a loop that guesses what your preferences are. They say this is to better serve their customers and

link them to the information they want. This is however a virtual wiretap that can be used in unethical ways. Companies will sell this

information to other countries or businesses. For example, Facebook sold their user’s data to England and claimed it was to better

serve its user’s needs. This is not only a huge violation of human rights; it is also treason. This information can be used against the

United States and endanger its citizens. My suggestion is to keep business and information in America. The Chinese Government

treats their own people poorly and as it states in American Factory; Social and Cultural Docs: Video time: 1:14:15 Quote from Jeff,

Fuyao President: “We need to use our wisdom to guide them and help them; because we are better than them”. Doing business

overseas is disenfranchising the American People. The Fuyao Glass Company in Ohio is a great example of how this laziness is

hurting Americans. In another part of the documentary American employees are worried because the Chinese are dumping illegally

into the USA sewer system without consequence. Whether its their information or labor; the American People are being sold to

China. This is an example of why the Federalists had a good idea about a Congressional Bank. It forced rich People to invest in the

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well-being and economy of the USA. Instead rich People make as much money as possible regardless of the consequences or lack

thereof. User’s information is seen as a commodity and stored in various warehouses world-wide for future exploitation. The best

thing is to use another search engine that is more responsible with its user’s data. Bribes are a thing of the past and not as common

as they used to be. These Companies usually have an extensive team of lawyers and any perks are usually done through legitimate

contracts. The most unethical example as far as bribes is Google getting a license to do whatever they want and gain billions a year

in Government contracts. The USA endorses this in exchange for User information. The actual business deals themselves are in

effect bribes because they control the influence of another party through kickbacks. Transcultural global ethics is being ignored

because China doesn’t have respect for our customs or values. This is portrayed very well in the Fuyao video because it shows

Americans trying to understand China and work together. China on the other hand uses the opportunity to belittle and disparage

Americans. The business is spilling over from China and is overwriting American values. Civil Rights already in place are being

ignored and the environment isn’t respected. When the USA has cities like Detroit in such a state of disrepair; it really isn’t

appropriate to outsource to China. Utilitarianism was violated due to the most people being harmed for the rich elitist of society while

deontology was also violated due to Companies that aren’t loyal to the USA.

References

Bogner, Steven, Reinhart, Julia. (2019). American Factory; Social and Cultural Docs: Higher Ground Productions.

Waddell, Kaveh. (2016). Why Google Quit China-and Why It’s Heading Back: The Atlantic

McCombs School of Business, (2020). Ethics Unwrapped: University of Texas at Austin

(http WILLIAM TREVOR -ST

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/765)

Yesterday

Trevor

Thank you for your post and comments. When you think about a global business, such as Google, to what extent does it project

US values and to what extent does it need to adapt its policies and practices to the markets in which it operates? Is there a

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balance here between commercial requirements and the need to uphold what might be seen as 'western' ethical standards

against a different way of doing business?

Will

(http

TREVOR KREJCI

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/49404)

8:58am

China Part 2

Trevor Krejci

Excelsior College

Class: Business Ethics

2/21/2020

The best way I can describe it to you is that, Google is a Government compliant agency. Therefor Google adheres to

Government demands but misrepresents themselves to the populace. They are Government contracted and serve the purpose

of tracking user information. As far as Google is concerned, Ethics isn’t really involved. Instead they are more concerned with

expansion and Government kickbacks. This is all displayed in their procedure from the initial article: Waddell, Kareh. (2016).

Why Google Quit China-and Why Its Heading Back: The Atlantic. They do what they are told in accordance to Government

entities to make as much money as possible. The last question was what I was trying to demonstrate with my earlier post about

Fuyao. The business policies and requirements are linked to Government and politics. The more our 2 Nations get deeper into

business and commercial requirements, our ethics will have to change to meet each-others needs. Chinese businesses bring

their values and they expect results. If you watch the video about the Fuyao Glass Company on Netflix, you can see how they

break the American Spirit and have no respect for our People. Bringing in Eastern values is hampering Western values and

demoralizing the USA. We have our own way of doing things that can be seen in a documentary called Koyaanisqatsi. There is

a part called “The Grid-Assembly Line” where it shows Americans of all races stamping out cars like nothing else. It will bring a

tear to your eye to see what we can do together in the USA. This film was shot in the 80s so what happened and when did

American labor become less valuable? Our Western ethics will work but we have to give incentives to do so. It is really odd that

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China is taking precedence over Detroit. Detroit was the wealthiest city in America in the 50s and has just been forgotten.

Businesses go to China for a better deal and cheaper labor. China is getting richer and richer and now are starting to buy us

out. We need to stop it by higher taxes for overseas companies and tax breaks for areas like Detroit. Even if we can’t work as

fast as the Chinese, our Western individuality will create more imagination thereby creating higher technologies. This all needs

to be done to simply make the statement that the stamp of the USA means it’s the best. They need to get out of here so we can

do things our way. If our work is slower but of higher quality then we still win. If we put America first and get everyone on the

same track, we can be the best in the World again.

References

References:

Bogner, Steven, Reinhart, Julia. (2019). American Factory; Social and Cultural Docs: Higher

Ground Productions.

Waddell, Kaveh. (2016). Why Google Quit China-and Why It’s Heading Back: The Atlantic

McCombs School of Business, (2020). Ethics Unwrapped: University of Texas at Austin

https://cloud.google.com/security/compliance/services-in-scope/

Reggio, Godfrey. (1982-1983). Koyaanisqatsi: Institute for Regional Education

(http

TREVOR KREJCI

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/49404)

10:03am

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https://youtu.be/Mn_wVXK3cok

(https://

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MARK KERN

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/1948)

Monday

Cultural Issues.

In the United States Coast Guard, we had a culture of Always Ready. That meant that any situation could occur while we were at sea

and we could determine a way to address it successfully to complete the mission and save lives or capture the bad guys. It was

always assumed that we would never endanger our crew’s lives beyond what could be done – but there were always inherent risks in

everything we did.

One of our most problematic ethical dilemmas was what to do with a Commanding Officer who ran his or her ship aground. Was it

ethical to hold that CO accountable and discipline them or even take them to a court-martial for unnecessarily endangering their

crew’s lives or losing their ship? Or was it acceptable that they were taking calculated risks in a culture that emphasizes being

Always Ready – Semper Paratus – to complete the mission in all circumstances.

For this ethical dilemma, it was generally acceptable to use a Fairness and Justice approach to the problem. The person

investigating the incident and the Senior Officer who was to make the final judgment towards the CO would look at similar situations

and provide like punishment or accountability for similar cases. In one incident, I was the Investigating Officer for a CO who ran her

ship aground while chasing a drug smuggler near the Bahamas Banks. The smuggler had a shallow draft vessel and quickly ran

across the banks where he could go and the cutter could not. The CO chased the smuggler using what she believed was accurate

navigation means to keep her from going aground. However, there was a misreading of the danger bearing and she did touch

bottom doing about $200K in damage to the cutter’s propellers. My investigation revealed that she was doing her job and there is a

cost of doing business when aggressively chasing drug smugglers. A new Admiral to the Drug smuggling waters of the Caribbean

disagreed with me and said that there was never an excuse for running a vessel aground. The convening officer agreed with my

findings and punished the CO with a remark in her fitness report regarding poor judgment. But she did not lose her command and

was able to recover from the incident to go on to a very successful career.

In another case, I touched bottom near a dock in San Juan, Puerto Rico when an uncharted debris dumping of tons of concrete was

piled up near the dock. I was exonerated from the incident when it was discovered that no announcement of the uncharted concrete

dumping was made. Of course, we immediately sent out a Notice to Mariners about the shallow spot near the dock and no other

ships touched it. I did zero damage to the ship. However, we did immediately report the incident, conducted a complete investigation

and made sure no damage was done by using Navy divers to examine the ship’s hull.

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In the final case I will describe, a very well-known and well-liked CO ran his ship aground, abandoned his ship and it sunk on the

Great Lakes. The circumstances were strange on how all of this happened. It was Christmas Eve and the CO was trying to get his

crew home for Christmas. They had one more buoy to service before they could go home – and they decided to do the work well

past midnight in order to get home in the early morning. They could have waited until daylight to service the buoy – but they wanted to

get home early, so they worked the buoy while they were tired and it was very dark. After working the buoy and placing it back on

station, the CO and all the experienced sailors went to the mess deck for coffee and to celebrate while a freshly qualified,

inexperienced Officer was left in charge of the ship’s navigation. The young officer made a mistake and went on the wrong side of

the buoy, which caused the ship to hit a rock and a small hole was made in the side of the ship. Seawater came in – but that can be

controlled using the ship’s pumps and a patch. We practice that all the time. However, on this ship, the last time they ran a damage

control drill was over a year ago (so much for Semper Paratus). Despite their lack of training and practice, the ship’s crew was

actually doing very well on fighting off the seawater and they were pumping out more water then was coming in. The patch was in

place and all was well. Then the CO decided that they had fought long enough and everyone was tired – so he decided to abandon

ship and have everyone get in the small boats and allow the cutter to sink. He felt like they had fought the ship long enough even

though his damage control personnel were telling him they were actually winning the fight. Most of the ship obeyed the abandon ship

message – but a few brave sailors continued to keep the pumps going and making sure the patch stayed in place. Upon

abandoning ship, the CO reported such to his Admiral ashore. When the Admiral asked if everyone had departed the ship, the CO

replied that a few crew members had remained aboard and were still fighting to keep the ship afloat. The admiral ordered the CO to

immediately return to the ship and try to keep it from sinking. If a few crew members believed that they could save the ship, then the

whole crew ought to be there to help them. By the time they returned to the ship, the anchors that were set to keep the ship from

getting closer to the rocks were not holding because the crew had abandoned their stations and were not tending them when the CO

ordered the abandon ship. Therefore, the ship was getting pushed closer to the rocks and the crew had not gotten the engines back

online to keep the ship from going onto the rocks. Once the crew was back on board, it was too late. The ship had gotten too close

to the rocks and several small holes were being punched into the hull. The crew attempted to patch these holes – but the ship kept

being pushed onto the rocks and more holes kept punching through the hull. Eventually, the pumps could not keep up and the CO

ordered another abandon ship. This time it was because the water coming in exceeded the water being pumped out. And this time,

the CO was the last to leave the ship. After everyone had departed the ship, it took about two minutes for the ship to sink and slide

down a steep slope into very deep water. No lives were lost. The CO claimed victory since no one lost their lives and they remained

safe. The Admiral had a different view. The CO was court-martialed for failure to keep his ship ready (no drills for the past year) and

endangering his crew. He served time in Leavenworth Prison.

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In all of these cases, the organization’s culture played a large part. Each circumstance was different – which resulted in different

results. Do you agree with the results in each case? Or would you decide a different ethical decision for the CO?

R/ Mark Kern

(http

TREVOR KREJCI

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/49404)

Tuesday

 Reply 

In all cases the Commanders should have been fired or put on desk duty or something. This posting demonstrates some next level

stupidity and all I can really say is wow! None of these Commanders were fit to command these vessels based on your posting.

The first 2 were using only depth finders to navigate which shows huge inexperience. By putting idiots behind the helm, how much

taxpayer money was wasted? Shouldn't a Captain know their ships capabilities? The 1st Captain had no reason to be in charge of

that vessel and was amateur, the 2nd cant really be judged without the harbormasters report and the third is so stupid I don't really

know what to say. This is what happens when you just hand over ships to imbeciles with no experience. If you don't know basic

sailing techniques, weather patterns and celestial navigation then you have NO business commanding a ship. When you leave

Port you should always consult with the harbormaster beforehand and launch at high tide. Weather conditions are also important

because heavy wind can push the water in the harbor out to sea. All 3 of these commanders had a similar issue of not being

educated about or respecting Nature. The 3rd was the worst because he didn't have the technical knowledge to solve a pretty

simple issue. A Captain should understand technology, engineering and oceanography. The type of problem in the 3rd issue

should be what a commander lives for and an easy fix. This presents deeper rooted issues because if a commander cant handle

something this minor, they are basically useless in a combat or defense capacity.

(http

CHACE DEAN ALLEN

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/33562)

Wednesday

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Trevor,

I think you assume too much in your post.

I think the first CO was a victim of circumstance.

I think the second was innocent completely.

I think the third was neglectful and didn't embody the virtues a CO should hold during emergency situations.

Chace

(http

TREVOR KREJCI

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/49404)

3:04am

 Reply 

I'm sorry you feel that way but as I already stated I cannot make a definitive analysis on the 2nd issue without the

harbormasters report. It takes 10 years of seamanship to in reality be able to command a vessel over 60 feet in length. If the

Government and Coast Guard didn't adhere to this then they are also at fault. As a certified marine technician what I can tell

you is that the 3rd commander panicked and was grossly negligent. I personally am not the type to punish people especially

those serving the USA. However I would have recommended a piloting safety course or some type of further training for the

1st and 2nd issue. The 3rd commander was obviously unfit to carry out the job and should have been put on desk duty and

eventually let go by the Coast Guard.

(http

ISAIAH MANUEL LOPEZ

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/38164)

Tuesday

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I feel as for the last scenario you gave about the CO abandoning the ship and declaring victory because no one had lost their lives

is wrong. He should have been punished for a lot of things he did wrong. First he shouldn't have worked his crew all night if he

knew how tired they were because they wouldn't have got it done correctly. Even though it was Christmas and they wanted to get

home as fast as they could it delayed their process at the end. Them not practicing drills for emergency falls on him also. Me being

in the Army my leadership always practices for emergency. We go over first aid all the time, small arm attacks all the time and

more to make sure we are always aware of what to do in certain situations. When it came down to his crew fixing the hole and they

had it all under control and he decided to take off and leave people on board he was wrong for that. As a leader you should never

leave your men behind in a dangerous environment and I feel he should be punished for that.

(http MARK KERN

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/1948)

Yesterday

 Reply 

Isaiah - You said a key comment that was the reason the last CO went to jail. He never practiced emergency situations. He held

very few drills but always ended all drills with an abandoned ship scenario. Therefore, in his mind and in many of his crew's

minds, they were just going to try to save the ship for a little while and then go to an abandoned ship. That type of training led to

his demise. R/ Mark Kern

(http

BRYAN C KNOOP

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/33119)

Tuesday

Professor Kern,

In response to your post on Cultural Issues, I would say that it is ethical to hold the CO’s accountable for their actions with their ship.

In the military, we are held accountable for all of our actions even when we take calculated risks as you described. The one thing

that must be done through when holding them accountable is like any other citizen in America, and that is to give them their due

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process under the law. The ethical theory of Fairness and Justice (Gilbert, 2016) is what I would use to analyze this. Similar

situations need to be treated fair but impartial to the individual. Each situation you described is different in the events leading up to

the incidents, so therefore they need to be treated differently when dealing with punishment for them.

The first situation you described is one that I would agree was the cost of doing business in a dangerous profession. From what

you described, there was no neglect on the CO’s part, so therefore it needs to go down as you said “part of the job”. Use the

information gathered from this and learn from it so others don’t make the same mistake in that area. This situation was

constrained by the Admiral's comment that there are never any excuses. I am glad that justice prevailed in this situation.

The second situation should have had Army Engineer Divers inspect for damage. That was the biggest mistake any CG Captain

can make. Just kidding, I think the outcome on this was both fair and just for the situation. The Army had a similar situation a few

years back where the boat captain ran his vessel aground. During the investigation, it was found that the charts that were provided

to the captain were not updated. The boat captain was found to not be at fault for the incident and no charges were brought against

him. All the charts were then updated with the proper ones.

The third incident you described was difficult to stomach. There was negligence on the ship’s CO part for sure and I agree with the

punishment he received. I like how you said that he was well-liked, but unfortunately, that should not be considered when making a

judgment on this incident. John Rawls stated that there is bias when making decisions like this. He stated that one must put

themselves behind a veil of ignorance in order to make the fair and just decision on how to handle the outcome for the CO (Gilbert,

2016). Removing the bias and looking at the events in a factual way makes this outcome just and fair. The CO was given a mission

and he failed to do the duty that was expected of him.

V/R

Bryan

References

Gilbert, J. (2016). Ethics for managers: Philosophical foundations and business realities (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge,

Taylor & Francis.

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(http MARK KERN

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Yesterday

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Bryan - I laughed at your joke on the Army divers. I must tell you though that Army divers and Army boat drivers are some of the

most professional and amazing people with whom I have worked. I had a terrible case in Haiti where a ferry boat had sunk

alongshore. The shoreline was extremely steep and the ferry was sitting along the steep bank about 75 feet down. I could not

maneuver my 210 foot Coast Guard cutter into a position to anchor over the ferry and support the Army divers who came to

assist in helping get the bodies of the people who had sunk with the ferry. I attempted to support them from my small boats, but

the boats were inadequate to provide all the support for all the equipment needed. Therefore, an Army, 157 foot, construction

boat came from Panama to assist. The Warrant Officer who operated the boat was amazing to maneuver in rapid currents to

put out three anchors and be directly over the ferry wreck. It was perfect to support the divers who then were able to release the

bodies in the ferry. We were able to deliver those bodies to the families who had closure on their loved ones and were able to

provide them good burials. My hat is off to the Army for showing me how to be the best at ship maneuvering. R/ Mark Kern

(http NATHANIEL WINSLOW

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/49612)

Wednesday

I think the only CO that got what they deserved was the guy who went to Leavenworth. I believe there should be evenly applied

punishment that is proportional to the offense. I was taken to Captain's Mast for fixing a string of lighting in my boats bathroom

without the right paper work. Nothing I did was unsafe, my XO during my XOI even admitted what I did was what he would do if he

were working on a light in his home. However, I did break the rules, I failed to follow a written order and so I got busted down a rank

and they took half my paycheck for two months. For fixing a light. Just to make sure that's clear, the lights worked afterwards, it was

just a lose wire. So this was not even like hitting something, and there being no damage. My actions made the boat more

functional, a net gain. So I got my career stunted, my family had to do without half a paycheck for two months and the boat goat a

little more fixed all so the CO could make a point. Now in these cases, people ran their boats aground and I'm supposed to think

that they don't deserve to be fired and thrown into a career killing, yet safe billet where they can't risk anymore lives and millions of

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dollars of assets. I would decide a different ethical outcome and punish these COs like a CO of a submarine or aircraft carrier

would be if they ran into something. They'd be relieved of their command and sent to pilot a desk for a few years, on top of the

negative administrative remarks. The culture shouldn't vary from ship to ship or even squadron to squadron (or however the

Coasties organize it) there should be a uniform understanding that boats belong in the water, not on land, and it's not ok to beach

your vessel. They call it a Uniform Code of Military Justice for a reason. Just for context Article 110: Improper Hazarding of Vessel,

caries a maximum punishment of death if the act is found to be willing and wrongful.

(http MARK KERN

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/1948)

Yesterday

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Nathan - If it is of any consolation, I would not have given you any punishment at Captain's Mast. Dismissing the case with a

warning would have been sufficient to get the point across that rules need to be followed. Sorry that happened to you. I do not

think it was fair. R/ Mark Kern

(https:// ISAIAH MANUEL LOPEZ

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/38164)

Tuesday

I feel as if google does not maintain the values of human rights because as my classmate has said in his response that google saves

peoples search history into their search engine and that could be dangerous or just other countries can have access to that because

they can easily hack into peoples search engine. As a example Waddell states that googles shut down their operation with China

because of a cyber attack. (Weddell, 2016) Also while reading the article it seems to say that these internet companies need to

follow the laws of speech while giving other countries access to their search engine. As for human rights people in america have their

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right to freedom of speech which is the first amendment as stated in the article. So for people in other countries to not have the same

right as people in the united states is different and these internet companies need to be aware of that when it comes to google giving

other counties access to their browser. Usually when it comes to big name companies they have a set of good talented lawyers who

are good at their jobs. So when it comes to bribes these lawyers take care of it and make sure things get done the proper way so the

company doesn't take a hard negative impact.

Waddell Kaveh; Why Google Quit China--- and Why It's Heading Back; January 19, 2016

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/

(https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/)

(http MARK KERN

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/1948)

Yesterday

 Reply 

Isaiah - Do you think it was ethically correct for Google to hand over their files on what people said to the Chinese authorities? It

may be true that China law said the State has a right to see what you are saying or searching for on the Internet. Did Google have

the right or ethical authority to refuse to abide by that Chinese law? Google executives knew that if they turned over all this

information, certain Chinese people may be persecuted and jailed because of their beliefs or searches on political issues,

freedoms and Western cultures. R/ Mark Kern

(https:// TIMOTHY DAVID SOLLENBERGER

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/47424)

Tuesday

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Trans-cultural global ethics always maintains the value of human rights. Have Google’s operations been consistent with

the value of human rights? What example can you give to support your position?

The article provided for this week’s reading would indicate the Google (at least in China) has taken a position that they will

defer business growth for Human Rights advocacy. Per this weeks article, following an attack in 2010, the company intentionally

drove search results in China to an unfiltered engine in Hong Kong, knowing full well that this would end with them ceasing business

in China (Waddell, 2016). This demonstration and loss of potentially billions in revenue would lead one to believe that Google holds

Human Rights and ethical business practice in high regards all the time.

Further reading into the subject of Google business in China turned up alternate points of view on the matter. Ross

LaJeunesse a former executive with Google left the company amidst a transition as he states from a company that held human rights

as a top priority to one that is now exploring market opportunities and growth. Specifically, in China, the project, named ‘Dragonfly’ is

set to launch in China. This is a censored version of the Google search engine that will meet the requirements of the Chinese

government (Tiku, 2020). If true this would be an example of how Google has not been consistent with its own application of human

rights policies. Specifically, dealings with the Chinese government which has a long documented history of human rights violations.

Other implications for Google and other large tech firms is dealing with government and military parties using their technology in

weapons systems development. There is argument to be made that technology companies selling their goods to military

organizations to carry out attacks on other persons would go in the face of a human rights approach to business.

Google is in the internet business, but many global operations include sourcing supplies that are sold elsewhere. What

suggestions would you have for an organization that is seeking to enter the global market for sourcing products and

services in order to support human rights and provide some standard for ethical transactions?

One good place to start would be identifying the ISO certifications that are applicable to the business they are entering.

These could include ISO 9000 for quality assurance, 14000 for environmental standards, and 19600 for compliance management.

Although the ISO is not a government run organization, it is accepted in over a 100 nations and gives a common ground for business

in international markets to be on the same page with many facets of the marketplace (Ferrell, 2016). Further the company needs to

develop its own written policy on human rights and ethics. Then communicate this to its employees, customers, etc. When faced with

ethical dilemmas having an already thought out strategy for answering those challenges will make it easier to have a consistent

approach. This approach was discussed in one of the earlier GVV Pillar videos, in which the suggestion was made to write out

answers to tough questions, so thought was put into ethical predicaments before they came up. This makes it easier to stay on the

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ethical track. Lastly, the company should include in that policy a system to either reward (Financially?) or recognize good ethically and

human rights decisions.

What role do bribes play in conducting business overseas? Are technology companies, which are eager to gain market

share in growing economies, at risk of violating the provisions of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act?

Bribes play several roles in doing business overseas. The Harvard Business Review article gives an estimate of $400 billion

per year in kickbacks. Activities including paying off local government officials, perimeters, and change of local law. All of these

activities by some companies are seen as a means of entering a market. The HBR article further discusses how competitive

businesses often look at bribery as a built in cost, because “everybody is doing it” (Montero, 2018). The FCPA was issued in 1977 to

make it unlawful for certain persons within publicly traded companies to bribe foreign officials to obtain or retain business.

Technology companies would be at risk of violating this, as many technology companies are global and growing rapidly. For example

the SEC webpage provides a listing of companies that have paid finds associated with FCPA violations. This list from 2019

includes: Microsoft Corporation, Cognizant Technologies, and Mobile Tele systems (Russian communications company). With such

reach and need to open markets overseas, technology companies could find it easy to use bribery to get local laws changed to allow

for delivery of their product.

Reply to ethics about CO ethical decisions.

I agree with and understand the decisions that were made for all three situations regarding the CO’s. The main item that

sticks out to me, is that the last individual who ended up serving time, made several bad decisions leading up to the outcome and

loss of his vessel. Not training his personnel and putting them at risk of their lives resides on the CO. This is akin to a fire chief

allowing his Firemen to not train and all and then asking to keep his job when every house they tried to save burned down. The item

that really sticks out to me in that example is that the CO did not have the leadership that when he sounded the first abandon ship, the

CO did not ensure that all personnel exited.

References

Ferrell, O. C., & Ferrell, L. (2016). Ethics and Social Responsibility in Marketing Channels and Supply Chains: An Overview. Journal

of Marketing Channels, 23(1/2), 2–10. https://doi.org/10.1080/1046669X.2016.1147339

(https://doi.org/10.1080/1046669X.2016.1147339)

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 Reply 

Montero, D. (2018). How Managers Should Respond When Bribes Are Business as Usual. Harvard Business Review Digital

Articles, 6–10.

SEC Enforcement Actions: FCPA Cases. (n.d.). Retrieved February 18, 2020, from https://www.sec.gov/spotlight/fcpa/fcpacases.shtml (https://www.sec.gov/spotlight/fcpa/fcpa-cases.shtml)

Tiku, N. (2020, January 2). A top Google exec pushed the company to commit to human rights. Then Google pushed him out, he

says. Retrieved February 18, 2020, from https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2020/01/02/top-google-exec-pushedcompany-commit-human-rights-then-google-pushed-him-out-he-says/

Waddell, K. (2016, January 19). Why Google Quit China-and Why It's Heading Back. Retrieved February 17, 2020, from

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/

(https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/)

(http MARK KERN

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/1948)

Yesterday

 Reply 

Timothy - I viewed Dragonfly as a way to comply with the Chinese government to follow their laws in revealing and allowing the

monitoring of user accounts in China. The way the system worked was that Chinese users cannot gain access to certain

information or knowledge that accessing such information would result in the Chinese government arresting those users. Dragonfly

allowed Chinese users certain access to Google information without endangering them to arrest and persecution by the Chinese

government. Is that not the ethical thing to do? Isn't providing some access to information better than providing no access? R/

Mark Kern

(https://

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CHRISTIAN PATRICK LATTIMORE

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/50338)

Wednesday

Professor Kern and Class,

I personally believe in “most” of the verdicts that were levied on the different CO’s in the boat damage cases. I don’t believe the first

CO should have had negative repercussions. There is a risk and a cost of doing business, but that’s simply how the military works.

While $200k certainly is a lot of money, the US spends upwards of $1.4million on every tomahawk missile fired. I have personally

thrown more than $200k of equipment in the dumpster because we had to empty a space we used for storage for a huge ship-wide

inspection. I was one of 15 throwing equipment away. I believe that the cost of successfully catching the drug smuggler and not having

to pay for further operations against the individual is worth the risk of the $200k. The second CO did the right thing by notifying

everyone else of the concrete. There was no way to have avoided the incident, so the CO handled it responsibly. The third CO

deserves a lot of time in Leavenworth. There were so incredibly many things that the CO did wrong. I wouldn’t be surprised if the CO

was drunk. Abandoning your crew who are successfully saving YOUR ship is overwhelmingly arrogant and selfish, and without a

doubt conduct unbecoming of an officer.

I don’t believe Google’s operations have always been consistent with human rights. I think that when they shifted their services to

Hong Kong in a direct opposition to China, they were doing the right thing for human rights. There are two ways to look at them

moving back to China. From one ethical standpoint, Carroll’s CSR pyramid puts profitability as the most important foundation of a

business. Google services offered in China would no doubt make them a ton of money for their employees and shareholders. China

has a huge population. However, they would be forced to comply with China’s anti-human rights policies. In a way this would be

agreeing to and condoning China’s actions. However, I don’t think its ethically wrong for Google to enter China. No doubt China has

some sort of search engine in place that’s already following the censorship rules. Google is just doing the capitalistic thing and

presenting competition for profit. If human right are already being violated in China, giving them a better search engine, censored or

not, isn’t a political statement.

My suggestion would be to do proper research into different countries’ values before you do business with them. Have a rigid set of

values for your company as well. If those human rights issues align between your business and an interested country, then you will

have a prosperous and smart business relationship. I would suggest not doing business if you think a countries morals and values

are opposed to your business’.

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 Reply 

It seems in the current global economy, bribes are hugely important in business. Bribing government officials seems to be the current

par for business worldwide. I believe that in a capitalistic sense, bribes should be unnecessary in a worldwide economy, especially

for companies trying to get an in with growing economies in other countries. A capitalistic view would say that the best product would

make the most headway and earn the most business from growing countries. I believe that bribes would be implemented by the

runner ups. Hypothetically, let’s say Google is thee best search engine around and Bing is the second best. Bing might pay a bribe to

a government official to keep Google out of the growing country until Bing is already the staple in every household.

Christian

References:

Montero, D. (n.d.). How Managers Should Respond When Bribes Are Business as Usual. Retrieved from https://eds-b-ebscohostcom.vlib.excelsior.edu/eds/detail/detail?vid=2&sid=f97dc7c9-95ec-4ef3-a053-

7df6c5345c1d@sessionmgr102&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmUmc2NvcGU9c2l0ZQ==#AN=133142830&db=bth

(https://eds-b-ebscohost-com.vlib.excelsior.edu/eds/detail/detail?vid=2&sid=f97dc7c9-95ec-4ef3-a053-

7df6c5345c1d@sessionmgr102&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWRzLWxpdmUmc2NvcGU9c2l0ZQ==#AN=133142830&db=bth)

Waddell, K. (2016, January 19). Why Google Quit China-and Why It's Heading Back. Retrieved from

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/

(https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/)

Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. (2017, February 3). Retrieved from https://www.justice.gov/criminal-fraud/foreign-corruptpractices-act (https://www.justice.gov/criminal-fraud/foreign-corrupt-practices-act)

Brenkert, G.G. Google, Human Rights, and Moral Compromise. J Bus Ethics 85, 453–478 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-

008-9783-3

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(http MARK KERN

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/1948)

Yesterday

 Reply 

Christian - Great post. The third CO was not drunk. However, it could have been true based on all the other mistakes he had

made.

Your comments on bribes were well researched and well stated. Is there ever an ethical time to pay the bribe? If bribes are simply

the expected way to get materials or equipment in or out of a country, is that an acceptable and ethical time to give a bribe? R/

Mark Kern

(https:// ALEXIS HEALY

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/49011)

Wednesday

Transcultural global ethics always maintains the value of human rights. Have Google’s operations been consistent

with the value of human rights? What example can you give to support your position?

In the time of big data and technological advances human rights need to be assessed for what it is. When we talk about google, we

are talking about the leader in search engines used by millions. In this scenario Google chose not to be a part of oppressed China.

Google’s move to pull the plug in China is an extreme example of the kinds of decisions Internet companies operating abroad are

often up against: If they want to do business, they have to abide by local laws, which can include restrictions on speech (Waddell,

2016). In my opinion the human rights deal with basic human needs, but rights that governments give people such as freedom of

speech vary from country to country. If companies want to operate in other countries then they should abide by the countries rules it is

pretty simple, as long as the governments rules arent violating basic human needs. To say Google is violating basic human rights by

abiding by the countries laws is the same as saying the countries laws are violating basic human rights, and in this case freedom of

speech is not a basic human right in certain countries.

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 Reply 

Google is in the internet business, but many global operations include sourcing supplies that are sold elsewhere.

What suggestions would you have for an organization that is seeking to enter the global market for sourcing

products and services in order to support human rights and provide some standard for ethical transactions?

Companies looking to source supplies should make sure places that are the source have ethical practices such as; fair wages, fair

employment, and economical restriction on waste and pollution. A good example is companies moving to China for source of

manufacturing due to China’s low costs, but this was mainly due to the low wages that were being paid to employees. This is an

example of unethical business practices by the Chinese government.

What role do bribes play in conducting business overseas? Are technology companies, which are eager to gain

market share in growing economies, at risk of violating the provisions of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act?

Bribes can occur in any company and in my opinion are a reflection of the company’s leadership. According to research into dozens

of bribery cases and five years of reporting on four continents, bribery happens because executive believe that their competitors are

using bribery as a tool to get ahead, so they must too (Montero, 2018). Since there is no minimum amount of accepting a bribe all

companies are at risk of violating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The virtue theory of ethics is at plat in all of these situations,

companies not only need to do what is right they need to train employees to do so as well.

References:

Montero D. (2018) Harvard Business Review. HowManagers Should Respond When Bribes are Business as Usual. Retrieved

from: https://eds-a-ebscohost-com.vlib.excelsior.edu/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=1&sid=0c36a743-e1d8-487a-8d40-

acf3c9ba63c5%40sdc-v-sessmgr03

Waddell K. (2016) The Atlantic. Why Google Quit China -and Why It’s Heading Back. Retrieved from:

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/

(http MARK KERN

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/1948)

Yesterday

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 Reply 

Alexis - The Chinese rules on controlling what their people can or cannot say or what information they can or cannot have access

to is extreme. Isn't an ethical stand against such oppression the right thing to do? Or is it more ethical to abide by the nation's

laws even when those laws are so oppressive to the people? R/ Mark Kern

(https:// CHACE DEAN ALLEN

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/33562)

Wednesday

Classmates,

Transcultural global ethics always maintains the value of human rights. Have Google’s operations been consistent

with the value of human rights? What example can you give to support your position?

I would say Google and many other companies have not been consistent with human rights. Google and others allowing governments

to censor and repress the human rights of their people is unethical in the same way that allowing someone to assault another person

when they have the means to stop them is also being unethical.

Google is in the internet business, but many global operations include sourcing supplies that are sold elsewhere.

What suggestions would you have for an organization that is seeking to enter the global market for sourcing

products and services in order to support human rights and provide some standard for ethical transactions?

For global operations sourcing out of other countries I would suggest that a basic level of human rights are acknowledged such as

fair pay for labor and health requirements while working. Other rights and benefits can be controversial about what is required of the

employer such as taking advantage of the local economy, age of workers, and treatment of workers, but they still need to be

considered on a global scale.

What role do bribes play in conducting business overseas? Are technology companies, which are eager to gain

market share in growing economies, at risk of violating the provisions of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act?

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 Reply 

I would imagine bribes pay a large part in conducting business in general, whether legal or not. A “legal” form of bribery could be as

simple as higher pay for allowing the business to run there or better benefits to the local people. The boundaries of what is or isn’t a

bribe can be difficult to establish in global economies. I think technology companies are just as at risk of violating FCPA as any other

global company.

Chace

References:

Waddell, K. (2016). Why Google Quit China—and Why It’s Heading Back. Retrieved from

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/

(http MARK KERN

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/1948)

Yesterday

 Reply 

Chace - Your points about global human rights are interesting to me. While every country has a right to make their own laws, does

every country have a right to treat humans so differently regarding human rights and freedoms? Is there a list of global human

rights and freedoms that you believe should be adhered to by all nations? What would it be? R/ Mark Kern

(https:// BRYAN C KNOOP

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/33119)

Yesterday

Have Google’s operations been consistent with the value of human rights? What example can you give to support your

position?

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This question has taken me to many websites looking for an answer. From the research I have found, Google is at least on the

surface is consistent with the value of human rights. There was a project though they were working on back in 2018 called Project

Dragonfly which was going to be used in China that would conform to the country's strict laws on censorship. This project, had it

actually been launched, would have me say that Google is not conforming to the value of human rights. The public found out about this

and Google has since shut down the project (Su, 2019). This project would have put Google back into the Chinese market which

could have increased its customer base exponentially. To me, it is confusing as to why Google would consider this after being a

member of the Global Network Initiative which would have called them out on this project (About GNI, 2020).

What suggestions would you have for an organization that is seeking to enter the global market for sourcing products

and services in order to support human rights and provide some standard for ethical transactions?

I would consider following the guidelines that are laid out by organizations such as the GNI and the United Nations Universal

Declaration of Human Rights documents. Both of these along with ISO participation would help lay the groundwork for a successful

venture in the global market. The ISO breaks the standardization down into different standards that would cover many different areas

of the business, unlike the GNI which focuses mainly on the flow of information.

What role do bribes play in conducting business overseas? Are technology companies, which are eager to gain market

share in growing economies, at risk of violating the provisions of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act?

Bribes play a larger role in conducting business overseas than many would realize. The way we see business is what we perceive

when we drive down our streets at home. I have dealt with foreign governments and seen the way business is conducted there. It can

be grossly different than the way we do business here in America. Local politicians in foreign countries sometimes see what the law

calls bribery just a normal way to conduct business. The US has outlawed business from accepting bribes while doing business

outside of the United States but they are allowed to accept facilitating payments which to me seems like small bribes. I would say that

most businesses that do business in foreign countries are at risk of violating the FCPA provisions, not just the technology

companies.

References:

About GNI. (2020). Retrieved from https://globalnetworkinitiative.org/about-gni/ (https://globalnetworkinitiative.org/aboutgni/)

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 Reply 

Ferrell, O. C., & Ferrell, L. (2016). Ethics and Social Responsibility in Marketing Channels and Supply Chains: An Overview. Journal

of Marketing Channels, 23(1/2), 2-10. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1080/1046669X.2016.1147339

(https://doi.org/10.1080/1046669X.2016.1147339)

Gilbert, J. (2016). Ethics for managers: Philosophical foundations and business realities (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge, Taylor

& Francis.

Global Network Initiative. (2014). Public Report on the Independent Assessment Process for Google, Microsoft, and Yahoo.

Washington DC: Global Network Initiative. Retrieved from https://globalnetworkinitiative.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/GNIAssessments-Public-Report.pdf (https://globalnetworkinitiative.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/GNI-Assessments-PublicReport.pdf)

Montero, D. (2018). How Managers Should Respond When Bribes Are Business as Usual. Harvard Business ReviewDigital

Articles, 6-10. Retrieved from https://eds-a-ebscohost-com.vlib.excelsior.edu/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?

vid=4&sid=fa579fd1-08a2-468e-8f37-5803ad749a3b%40sessionmgr4008 (https://eds-a-ebscohostcom.vlib.excelsior.edu/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=4&sid=fa579fd1-08a2-468e-8f37-5803ad749a3b%40sessionmgr4008)

Su, J. (2019). Confirmed: Google Terminated Project Dragonfly, Its Censored Chinese Search Engine. Retrieved from Forbes:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/jeanbaptiste/2019/07/19/confirmed-google-terminated-project-dragonfly-its-censored-chinese-searchengine/#4c0fc6797e84

Universal Declaration of Human Rights. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/

(https://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/)

Waddell, K. (2016). Why Google Quit China-and Why It's Heading Back. Retrieved from The Atlantic:

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/

(https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/)

(http

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MARK KERN

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/1948)

Yesterday

 Reply 

Bryan - Take a closer look at Dragonfly. It may have provided Chinese people the opportunity to access Google's search engine

without the dangers of being persecuted or arrested by the Chinese government. Yes, it did mean that Chinese users of Google

would not be able to access everything that most of the world's users of Google can access. But at least they could access some

information. Isn't that better than no information? What other access do Chinese people have now? Without Google, their access

to information is extremely limited. Isn't some access to information more ethical than no access? R/ Mark Kern

(https:// STEVEN FERGUS

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/20531)

Yesterday

We all see the world from our own perspectives and what we understand as human rights are entitled to all human beings, in spite

of race, sex, ethnicity, nationality, religion, language, and so on. “Human rights include the right to life and liberty, freedom from slavery

and torture, freedom of opinion and expression, the right to work and education, which everyone is entitled to these rights, without

discrimination” (United Nations, 2020). I do believe that google violated the human right of freedom of opinion and expression, as

well as going against their mission statement, “organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful”

(Comparably, 2020). By doing business with China they were clearly going against human rights and their mission because they

conformed to China’s censorship policies and filtered search results, just to be able to do business in their country (Waddell, 2016).

Google as a company pride themselves on being innovative and a progressive company as they make clear in their vision

statement ,“to provide access to the world’s information in one click” (Comparably, 2020), which the laws of China would not allow.

The suggestions I would have for an organization seeking to enter the global market for sourcing products and services in order to

support human rights with a standard for ethical transactions, would be learning how the laws of the different countries have, and find

the middle ground on what products don’t violate those laws. Another suggestion would be to find local companies that have the

potential or already providing services and ethically open to growth.

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The role bribes have in the corporate world is always going to be profit driven. Bribery is unethical behavior which causes a

number of problems all credited to business bribery. Other than it being illegal, all countries have laws in place to prohibit bribery

which if a company is engaging in bribery is expose momentous legal risks to all parties involved in the company (Lumen Learning,

2020). Other rules/ regulations that are circumvented by bribery usually have a purpose. Giving of bribes may create a culture of

corruption in the foreign country, laws such as the US Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) were created to prevent such acts of

corruption. “The FCPA applies only to bribes paid (or offered) to foreign government officials to obtain or retain business or to

develop an unfair competitive advantage” (Lumen Learning, 2020), which technology companies that are eager to gain market

shares in growing economies could be at risk of violating if bribery was used as a way of staying ahead of the competition. A

corporation that is accused or convicted may suffer a serious public relations backlash. But at the end of the day it is up to the

individuals managing the company to direct the company’s moral compass, because a business is neither good or bad, it’s the

individuals running it responsibility on how its ran.

References

Comparably. (2020). Google Mission, Vision & Values. Retrieved from comparably.com:

https://www.comparably.com/companies/google/mission

Lumen Learning. (2020). Curruption in Internal Business. Retrieved from lumenlearning.com:

https://courses.lumenlearning.com/suny-good-corporation-bad-corporation/chapter/10-corruption-in-international-business/

United Nations. (2020). Human Rights. Retrieved from un.org: https://www.un.org/en/sections/issues-depth/human-rights/

Waddell, K. (2016, January 19). Why Google Quit China—and Why It’s Heading Back. Retrieved from theatlantic.com:

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/

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(http MARK KERN

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/1948)

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Steven - Take a closer look at bribes. I have worked in third world countries where the only way that police officers and customs

officials survive is through the bribes they receive on a routine, expected basis. It is part of the culture of that country. To not pay

the bribes deprives that official of an expected pay that his country's authorities feel they would receive. It hurts the individual and

their families. Their nation considers bribes as part of their compensation. Without the bribe money, there is not sufficient pay for

the police or customs officials to stay with their job.

There is no question that in a Western world's or U.S. sense, bribes are wrong. However, when bribes are the normal, expected

way of doing business and the reason why customs or police officials accept their jobs, is it ethically correct to refuse those

bribes? R/ Mark Kern

(https:// JOSEPH A HAIRSTON

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/37220)

Yesterday

Transcultural global ethics always maintains the value of human rights. Have Google’s operations been consistent with

the value of human rights? What example can you give to support your position?

I think Googles action in leaving China have hurt human right. Censorship in a lot of place is very oppressive. “If these companies do

whatever they’re capable of doing to publicize that their content is being screened, monitored, and sometimes censored by

governments, I think there’s a really good argument that maintaining a social-media presence is inherently a liberalizing force,”

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(Waddell K.). If Google would have applied Utilitarian theory it would have been clear that being in China would have benefited more

people then not being there. I seems that pulling out was paramount to a child having a tantrum to later learn they were wrong and that

they needed what they got upset about.

Google is in the internet business, but many global operations include sourcing supplies that are sold elsewhere. What

suggestions would you have for an organization that is seeking to enter the global market for sourcing products and

services in order to support human rights and provide some standard for ethical transactions?

I would recommend starting with Global Network Initiative (GNI) to find out more detail and get the frame work in place up front. This

will lay a nice foundation. I would also recommend implementing a standard from International Organization for Standardization. This

would provide a guide for ethical standards and compliance.

What role do bribes play in conducting business overseas? Are technology companies, which are eager to gain market

share in growing economies, at risk of violating the provisions of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act?

Bribes play a major roles in conducting business overseas. “according to the World Bank, roughly one-third of firms around the world

use kickbacks, paying an estimated total of $400 billion a year.” (Montero) In a lot of countries bribe are common place. Technology

companies are at great risk of vacillating the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. “Since 1977, the anti-bribery provisions of the FCPA

have applied to all U.S. persons and certain foreign issuers of securities.” (FOREIGN) Many companies put speed and profit over

doing the ethical thing. And since most companies don’t factor in the possible schedule delays, it is easy for employees to rationalize

paying bribes to keep process moving.

References:

Ferrell, O. C., & Ferrell, L. (2016). Ethics and Social Responsibility in Marketing Channels and Supply Chains: An Overview. Journal

of Marketing Channels, 23(1/2), 2-10. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1080/1046669X.2016.1147339 (Links to an external

site.) (https://doi.org/10.1080/1046669X.2016.1147339)

FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICES ACT. Retrieved from:https://www.justice.gov/criminal-fraud/foreign-corrupt-practices-act

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Montero D. (2018) Harvard Business Review. HowManagers Should Respond When Bribes are Business as Usual. Retrieved

from: https://eds-a-ebscohost-com.vlib.excelsior.edu/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=1&sid=0c36a743-e1d8-487a-8d40-

acf3c9ba63c5%40sdc-v-sessmgr03 (https://eds-a-ebscohost-com.vlib.excelsior.edu/eds/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?

vid=1&sid=0c36a743-e1d8-487a-8d40-acf3c9ba63c5%40sdc-v-sessmgr03)

Waddell K. (2016) The Atlantic. Why Google Quit China -and Why It’s Heading Back. Retrieved from:

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-headingback/424482/ (https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-headingback/424482/)

(http MARK KERN

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/1948)

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Joseph - You have taken a different stand on Google's decision to leave China than most of your classmates. However, I think you

are onto something. There is an aspect of Google's actions that I want you to comment upon too. I am concerned that Google

staying in China and China's laws that Google must allow the government's monitoring and turn over user information to the

government would lead to China authorities persecuting and arresting Chinese users for accessing certain information or

knowledge. Are you concerned about this aspect of how the Chinese government would use information from Google? Isn't this

danger a good, ethical reason for Google to leave China? Why or why not? R/ Mark Kern

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(https:// KELLY GRACE KREISEL

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/32477)

Yesterday

Transcultural global ethics always maintains the value of human rights. Have Google’s operations been consistent with

the value of human rights? What example can you give to support your position?

Even though Google initially released in China with less restrictions and censoring, the government would not allow them to continue

that way. I believe Google’s operations have been consistent with the value of human rights, and they have proven this by doing what

it takes to be present – but also letting the users know that some of their content is being blocked when it is. “To that end, Google

(https://www.google.com/transparencyreport/) , Facebook (https://govtrequests.facebook.com/) , and Twitter

(https://transparency.twitter.com/) all publish a detailed annual transparency report, where they show the number and type of contenttakedown or user-information requests they received, and the number they complied with, from each country where they operate.”

(Wadell. 2016) In addition, even though many organizations will not put the time and funding into it, Google is one that works with the

Global Network Initiative, which is a human rights organization that guides companies in how to handle these legal situations in the

best way to benefit the organization, comply legally and still be available to their users.

Google is in the internet business, but many global operations include sourcing supplies that are sold elsewhere. What

suggestions would you have for an organization that is seeking to enter the global market for sourcing products and

services in order to support human rights and provide some standard for ethical transactions?

An example of a significant miss in ethical decision making was when Apple decided to outsource production of the iphone to China.

While Apple was very well aware of their own labor policies, they did not also consider the way the workers in China would be

working as far as conditions, pay and hours in order to produce the large quantities of product they were demanding in a short time

frame. “Foreign direct investment can be considered a direct effect of globalization. By Apple participating in FDI, it outsources jobs

to China, were labor laws are in a less favorable position for workers. While Apple is not the only one, it is definitely one of the

biggest offenders in recent history. At the release of the white Iphone 4, Apple wanted the company to produce white Iphones without

any slow-down on the production of the normal Iphone 4. This in turn, created higher stress levels within the Foxconn employees, who

already had to deal with horrible working conditions. In turn, many workers resorted to suicides; leading many to question the

ethicality of the international world. Companies such as Apple, Sony, Microsoft and HP might follow the labor laws set in place within

western countries, but most of the consumers who buy their products do not realize that this means nothing in the countries where the

products they consume are made. Globalization, while pushing humanity as a whole towards the epitome of progress, has also

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brought about a major negative implication into the world market- the promotion of unethical behavior towards the working class of

developing nations.” (Vincente-Flores, 2014) I would suggest that organizations have dedicated staff members who specialize in

global relations and deals to handle decisions like this. It would allow them to better research and understand the weight and impact

of some of the decisions when dealing with foreign organizations and the differences in their operations and policies. They should be

working to align those policies and beliefs as much as possible as partners of the organization can be seen as representing them in

some ways.

What role do bribes play in conducting business overseas? Are technology companies, which are eager to gain market

share in growing economies, at risk of violating the provisions of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act?

Bribery is a concern when conducting business overseas because so many organizations have used it. It causes organizations to

resort to bribery even when they know its wrong, because they feel it’s what others are doing and the only way to get the business

ahead of someone else. It creates an unethical and unhealthy competition that is not based on what is best for either company

involved in many cases. When you think about what organizations really want, its to be involved and to build a strong presence and

relationship with organizations they partner with. According to Montero, organizations should be offering “a chance to participate in

high-level discussions about the company’s commitment to the local community and to give that office a greater voice in shaping

those decisions. Another is to offer to create more jobs or provide more training or technical service than your competitors are

offering.” (Montero, 2018)

Sources:

Montero, D. (2018). How Managers Should Respond When Bribes Are Business as Usual. Harvard Business Review Digital

Articles, 6–10.

Waddell, K. (2016, January 19). Why Google Quit China-and Why It's Heading Back. Retrieved February 17, 2020, from

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/

(https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/)

Vincente-Flores, Eric Francisco (2014, June 5) Foxconn Case Study: A Look at Ethics in the Global Marketplace. Retrieved

February 20, 2020, from http://pax.shc.edu/story/foxconn-case-study-look-ethics-global-marketplace

(http://pax.shc.edu/story/foxconn-case-study-look-ethics-global-marketplace)

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(http MARK KERN

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/1948)

Yesterday

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Kelly - I appreciate your sharing the issues on Chinese labor practices and international companies' actions that led to grave

consequences in the Chinese workforce. What are global companies to do with China? If they refuse to use Chinese labor, is that

punishing the workers in China who do need the work in order to survive? What policies or demands are legitimate for

international companies to make in order to use Chinese labor? R/ Mark Kern

(https:// TIMOTHY LAMONT HUGHES

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/31840)

9:02am

Google and China

In the article “Why Google Quit China—and Why It’s Heading Back”, Kaveh Wadell informs that Google stopped operations in China

due to concurrent cyber-attacks intended to cripple the organization’s operations. Despite the breaches, Google’s officials deemed

it the most ethical decision to continue operations in the country so that internet users would not have to suffer (Waddell, 2016). For

this to have been done, it proved significant for companies such as Google and Facebook to set rationales such as developing

transparency reports which would augment the companies’ social media presence (Waddell, 2016). With such actions taken, I would

assert that google endorses the value of human rights by warranting equitable access to information as well as by creating a

transparency validation to govern its operations.

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For companies intending to begin its operations in a new market, Rebecca MacKinnon asserts that it would be critical to perform a

human rights impact assessment (Waddell, 2016). From such an evaluation, businesses would be more capable of examining

immediate accountabilities to maintain human rights. In this sense, the business would be able to recognize possible ways of rights

infringement and equally develop a human rights policy. Hence, the company would be expected to comply with ethical and cultural

considerations of the same market which would ultimately make them attain a competitive advantage.

Bribes are useful to businesses, particularly when government officials are rewarded to do their jobs in an appropriate manner.

Through such transactions, the payment acts as a means to facilitate certain procedures (Cuervo-Cazurra, 2015). Thus, companies

may be eager to pay bribes and violate the provisions of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act to increase their market share, such as

with the case of Ericson ("Spotlight on Foreign Corrupt Practices Act," n.d.). Accordingly, the telecommunications company

attempted to bribe both the SEC and the DOJ with over $1 billion to resolve an initial bribe.

References

Cuervo-Cazurra, A. (2015). Corruption in international business. Journal of World Business, 51.

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jwb.2015.08.015

Spotlight on Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.sec.gov/spotlight/fcpa/fcpa-cases.shtml

Waddell, K. (2016, January 19). Why Google Quit China—and Why It’s Heading Back. Retrieved from

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/

V/r

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Timothy

(http MARK KERN

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/1948)

10:02am

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Timothy - This human rights impact assessment seems to be a great idea. How does it actually work? What types of human

rights questions or concerns does the assessment cover? Is it a standard set of questions or is it a general study that is

conducted to see how the nation conducts its human rights laws, policies and procedures? What are some of the important things

to consider and watch for in your mind in this assessment? In other words, if you were the HR Manager of the company, what

issues would you think are the most critical to examine in the rights impact assessment and why? R/ Mark Kern

(https:// KEITH R JACKSON

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/46852)

10:13am

In a ethical stand point I feel Google did not uphold the values of human rights because freedom of speech as long as there is no call

for violence I believe every human should have without restriction. In the case of Google working aboard with China they are given

“access to a large number of Internet users, delivering them more information, and at the same time bolstering the company’s bottom

line” (Wadedell, 2016, para. 24). Which I take as, if there is a profit to be made Google will bend its own ethics like having a freedom

of speech platform and censoring the content to make it more available to people such as China. Human rights are “apply regardless

of where you are from, what you believe or how you choose to live your life” (What are human right?, 2019, para. 1). So, even if its

against the law in China for some content to be seen its still violating human rights that everyone deserves. Understandable Google

is a company and its goal is to make profits, as their seeking to enter the global market they need to set clear boundaries for what

they will bring to other countries. If by law certain issues are banded from the countries just make their platform basic as possible so

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they are not violating laws but keeping users’ values. I believe bribes play a huge role in companies trying to grow into overseas

markets whether this is from kickbacks to actual shares in the companies. There is greed surrounding every company trying to grow

into a larger franchise.

Reference

Waddell, Kaveh. (2016). Why Google Quit China-and Why It’s Heading Back: The Atlantic retrieved from

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/

(https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/)

What are human rights? (19, June 19). Retrieved from https://www.equalityhumanrights.com/en/human-rights/what-are-human-rights

(http MARK KERN

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/1948)

10:27am

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Keith - You are arguing an interesting point about human rights versus the rights of a country to take care of its citizens. Let's bring

this home to the U.S. Does the U.S. have a right to look at things that terrorist's post on Facebook? If a non-U.S. citizen in the

U.S. receives a Facebook message from outside this nation that denigrates American interests and condones the killing of

Westerners, is that okay to be reported to the FBI? Or going to a more basic right of privacy, is it ethical for U.S. citizens to be

searched when they return from travel to a country that has terrorist camps and it was reported that this U.S. citizen went to those

terrorist camps? When is it ethical to invade human rights in order to protect others? R/ Mark Kern

(https:// ANDREW M OLSON

(https://excelsior.instructure.com/courses/16767/users/48170)

7:26pm

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The United Nations identifies Human rights as rights inherent to all human beings, regardless of race, sex, nationality, ethnicity,

language, religion, or any other status. Human rights include the right to life and liberty, freedom from slavery and torture, freedom of

opinion and expression, the right to work and education, and many more. The article present to read and many of the countries it

touched upon are members of the UN, with China being apart of the UN since its founding. This presents a very skewed view to me

in regards to what Google should or should not do in the countries it provides services to. On one hand I do not think any country

should act as "world police" and should not interfere outside their own borders. On the other hand I find it humorous that China is a

leading member of the UN yet does not hold the tenets of the UN to heart. I do believe Google has been consistent with the value of

human rights because they identify well with the UN's "Freedom of opinion and expression", as well as "the right for education." I

think Google attempts to facilitate to the worlds human rights issues but is smart about it by working with some governments to still

provide their product.

The advice I would give for any organization to break into the world market and sourcing products and services would be to have a

strong moral and ethical bedrock for their company. Know your limits of what you can and cannot provide. Everything does not

happen over night and many times you will be forced to work with people you do not agree with to get your message/product out.

Make the country you are trying to court understand your moral and ethical values based on human rights. If all else fails don't waste

your time, people have a funny way of getting the information they desire and nothing is more taxing to a government than a well

planned coup, because they have been used and abused.

Bribes can play a huge roll in a business deal overseas, although what one person views as a bribe, another my view as part of their

culture. Gift giving may appear as a bribe but many cultures view it as socially normal, the same way I bring a bottle of liquor to a get

together, its viewed as a "thank you for putting this together." I think any business, regardless of practice, is at risk of violating the

provisions of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act depending on the view taken by officials. As stated earlier a custom and courtesy of

gift giving at meetings may be misconstrued as a bribe when in reality it is showing respect. I do have to caveat that any form of

liquid currency, access to company property (i.e. yachts, planes, etc) more than likely would and should be considered a bribe.

Waddell, Kaveh. (2016). Why Google Quit China-and Why It’s Heading Back: The Atlantic.

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/

(https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/01/why-google-quit-china-and-why-its-heading-back/424482/)

United Nations. (2020). Human Rights. https://www.un.org/en/sections/issues-depth/human-rights/

(https://www.un.org/en/sections/issues-depth/human-rights/)

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Answer

The first element for supporting an organization’s transcultural policy is respect. Transcultural ethics policy requires building respect as the manager and surrounding yourself with employees you respect. Respect ensures that people can do their jobs to the best of their ability. The second element is an honor. Transcultural ethics policy requires dedicating special attention to employees and all stakeholders to make them exemplify the spirit of the organization. Additionally, integrity is a vital element of transcultural ethics because people from diverse backgrounds would not want you to cheat, steal, or lie (Gould). Therefore, treat others as you would want to be treated to earn the trust of customers. Also, you must include customer focus in the policy since it ensures that serving the people is based on your decisions and it is your sole responsibility to eliminate risks that can compromise your ethical responsibility....
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